Boston Walk For Choice

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Posts tagged with "activism"

"What Can I Do?" - Suggestions for Feminist Activism

mylifeasafeminista:

mylifeasafeminista:

keepyourboehneroutofmyuterus:

Anonymous asked you:

I love this blog so much, but when I read all the articles about states efforts to close down planned parenthood, or articles about how men should have a right to veto an abortion, I start to see red. What can I do? How can I help?

Thanks, Anon.

The eternal question when it comes to this issue, it appears.  I have been asked this before (and more than once) and so am just going to repeat myself again. 

Other than raising awareness about reproductive rights, what can we do to fight the good fight?

First, maybe I’m not the best person to ask, as my response to my un-ending anger and shock at the full-frontal attack conservatives are making against reproductive rights was to start a Tumblr.  And originally it was just going to be images making fun of John Boehner.  But here I am now so I am going to do my best to answer this request. 

If you out there in the Tumblr world have resources you’d like me to post, you can either answer this post or submit a link (over there on the left side menu).  You can also shoot me an email at scatx [at] scatx [dot] com.  Also, you can simply respond to this post.

I firmly believe that the more information you have, the better.  Hands down.

So, what can you do?

That’s what I’ve got for now. 

Let’s hear it, defenders of the uteri/defenders of reproductive rights/defenders of PP/defenders of bodily autonomy. 

What resources or sites would you recommend for people who want to be out there doing something on behalf of reproductive, abortion, bodily autonomy and women’s (really, anyone who is not a cisman’s) rights?

I really love that this is being addressed because I think it is extremely important that people recognize how they can transform their feminist thoughts into action.  All of the examples listed above are really great and I encourage everyone to get involved with those organizations in any way they can: volunteer at your local clinic, donate money, contact your representatives, and stay informed about political issues.  Although this list is absolutely fantastic, I wanted to add a few more ideas:

  • Volunteer for a local non-profit organization that supports the rights of women and the LGBTQ community.  This includes abortion clinics, health centers, domestic violence shelters, LGBTQ youth programs, etc.  If you can’t get transportation to one of these places, see what you can do over the phone or the internet.  Some examples include: volunteering to answer the telephones at your local domestic violence shelter, contributing to blogs/zines/online magazines/newspapers, and organizing the social media components for a non-profit organization.
  • Make your voice heard.  Participate in rallies or protests.  Create, sign, and/or share petitions.
  • If you can, be a conscious consumer.  Support organizations and businesses that respect the environment, treat their workers well, and give back to the community.  **This is inextricably linked to class and geographic location. Choosing where to give your dollars is a privilege, as the structure of our society, specifically our economic system, is not based off a model of conscious consumerism.  For example, health and organic foods are much more expensive than genetically modified and processed foods.  Because there is such a discrepancy in the costs, the latter is much more accessible.**
  • Make feminism your lifestyle.  When someone makes a sexist comment or laughs at a rape joke, confront them.  If someone is policing another person’s body or identity, explain to them why this is a problem.  Every time you take a stand against this type of behavior, you are educating those around you.  A lot of times, people worry that these types of actions are insignificant, but I strongly disagree with that.  Any and all positive changes are worth recognizing, as they contribute to making a difference.
  • Check your own privilege.  Each and every one of us have been influenced by the media, our parents, friends, our educational institutions, etc. Confront your own internalized sexism and dissect the way you think, act, and behave.  You may call women “sluts” or oppose third-trimester abortions, but why do you think and act in this way?  Question how you have been shaped by dominant ideologies and challenge yourself to see things from a different perspective. 

If anyone else has any other suggestions, I would love to hear them!

(Source: keepyourbsoutofmyuterus)

Aug 2

Solidarity with Dr. Carhart, women’s right champion, in pictures

femisisters:

Summer of Trust/Choice has gained a lot of momentum and I cannot believe how quickly it has sprung up on us!  On Sunday is the first event of the week and I look forward to seeing a lot of awesome activists standing in peaceful solidarity with Dr. Carhart.  We received a lot of picture submissions today giving thanks to Dr. Carhart.  Enjoy!

These signs came from the LA fundraiser for Summer of Trust at Revolution Book — check it out: http://www.summeroftrust.com/?p=327#meghan

How to be an Everyday Reproductive Justice Hero

1. Support a friend through a pregnancy.
When a friend tells you she is pregnant, be there for her. There is no need to be overbearing, but just let her know that you are there every step of the way if she needs you. If she decides to terminate, offer to go with her to the clinic, and check in with her afterwards. If she is continuing the pregnancy, ask her what she needs – time, ice cream, someone to hold back her hair, space. And when the baby comes, be a supporter, a babysitter, a researcher of daycare options, if that’s what she wants/needs. Show through your love and trust of the women in your life that women are worthy of love and trust.

2. Be a safe sex educator to your friends.
I know there is somewhere in your area where you can get free condoms. Go get some, and give them out to your friends. Keep a dish in your bathroom with a “help yourself!” sign on it for visitors. Hand them out relentlessly. Ask your friends what method of birth control they are using. Educate yourself and be a source of information and support. Use whatever you have up your sleeve – an air of compassion, a sense of humour – to make it ok to talk openly about sex around you.

3. Volunteer at your local clinic.
Always contact a clinic first and find out what they need. Most clinics do not need counter-protesters; they make patients nervous and incite anger. See if you can be a clinic escort: usually it’s a weekly commitment of a couple hours, and you will be directly helping women accessing sexual health services. Some clinics need other support – people to drive patients from the airport or neighbouring towns; people to host out-of-town patients overnight; people to answer phones or stuff envelopes. If you have the time to give to make yourself useful at a clinic, I promise you it will go far and be very much appreciated.

4. Lead a creative resistance.
If you are a creative person, create something. Write a letter to your representative or to the newspaper; write a blog; paint, write poetry, build a sculpture; do something big and amazing and thought-provoking or something small and quiet and cathartic. Sometimes the challenge of the movement can be so frustrating and make you so angry and sad and lost; express yourself. Often art has a way of reaching others and clarifying the issue in a way that simple explanations cannot.

5. Be an ally.
Who are the people in your community who are suffering most from the lack of access to reproductive healthcare services? Find out what they have to say. Figure out a way to use what privilege you have to be of service. This is a hard one, and a longterm thing. You will screw up. But it’s worth the effort.

6. Learn.
In whatever spare time you have, read about reproductive justice, and ask questions. Talk to people, whoever you can access – doctors, nurses, friends who have had abortions, friends who have had babies, doulas, midwives, your mother, your partner. Read blogs and articles. Inform yourself as much as possible; put yourself in a position of being able to speak to this issue and to help and support and inform the people around you. Knowledge is power.

7. Love.
I feel that this is at the root of it – true activism is an act of love. Never forget why we fight for access and the health and lives of our sisters. If we live every day and act out of love, we can’t lose. When in doubt, follow your heart.

Please feel free to comment with your own ideas and suggestions. Remember, the revolution will not be funded; we all have to keep in mind that service provision, while good and essential work, is only one piece of the puzzle. The battle will be won by the small, everyday acts of resistance that all of us can do.

8. Support mothers. Fight for legislation and local resources to help mothers feed, clothe, and educate their children as they see fit. Participate in local programs that will help mothers and families with childcare and basic needs. Help mothers who want to raise up their babies themselves to do so without judgement or shame. Fight the societal impulse to criticize mothers for anything that happens to their child and every decision they make on behalf of their own family. Support mothers.

New Hampshire stands with Planned Parenthood, against the Executive Committee who just voted to pull its funding.

May 5

Boston Slutwalk 2011

Are you going to SLUTWALK in Boston this Saturday?? We are too!! Look for the Boston WFC organizers with our R.A.G.E. banner!

Looking to get pumped for the event? Come to our Slutwalk Prep Party! It will be outside in Jamaica Plain on Friday night, weather permitting, and we will be making T-shirts and signs. Bring your crafty things and your badass attitude. Some of the SLUTWALK organizers will be there as well, along with other awesome local activists that will be stopping by. Check out the Facebook page for the details!


Anti-Choice and mixed-record Senators by state.
Contact your senators and let them know you expect them to vote in support of Reproductive Health and the right to choose.

Anti-Choice and mixed-record Senators by state.

Contact your senators and let them know you expect them to vote in support of Reproductive Health and the right to choose.

If you are interested in supporting Walk For Choice in Boston, please visit this page

That’s - http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=196002373753604

It’s very difficult to get the media interested in an event that is not done by the usual suspects / political groups with buckets of money and professional publicists and etc.

We need way more Facebook interest going in order to convince the news to send out their cameras.

Please take a moment and swing by the Facebook page, and share it with your friends.

Thank you so much for your help.

One more video - Jessica Teed Lockwood at the Boston Walk for Choice. Next to her is Stephanie Beal, one of the organizers.

"In this economic crisis, more and more of us are finding ourselves unable to pay for medical services, including abortion and birth control… if we can afford to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on two wars, I think we can afford to keep this funding [for Planned Parenthood]."

Rally speaker Nikki Tishler, at Boston Walk for Choice

"If you take away [access to Planned Parentood], how do you expect teenagers to be responsible?"

Another terrific speaker from the Boston Walk For Choice rally!